Every week we perform an audit against your website, we then prioritise the errors which are most important.

Audits constantly add new ranking factors and with search engines updating algorithms over 1200 a year this is a task which constantly requires work.

Below is a comprehensive list of tasks we regularly undertake on your website with a friendly explanation for each:

5xx errors These are typically server errors relating to your website host
4xx errors A meta refresh tag instructs a web browser to redirect a user to a different page after a given interval. Generally, it is recommended that you avoid using a meta refresh tag as it is considered a poor, slow and outdated technique that may lead to SEO and usability issues.
Title tag is missing or empty A <title> tag is a key on-page SEO element. It appears in browsers and search results, and helps both search engines and users understand what your page is about.
Duplicate title tag A unique title opens oppertunities to rank for multiple keyphrases and longtail keyphrases
Duplicate content Crawler reports pages that have duplicate title tags only if they are exact matches. Duplicate <title> tags make it difficult for search engines to determine which of a website’s pages is relevant for a specific search query, and which one should be prioritized in search results. Pages with duplicate titles have a lower chance of ranking well and are at risk of being banned. Moreover, identical <title> tags confuse users as to which webpage they should follow.
Broken internal links Broken internal links can cause a webpage to return an error status. This can occur due to an incorrect or malformed URL, or because the page the link is leading to is broken or no longer exists, etc. Multiple broken internal links may discourage users from visiting other pages of your website. Also, broken links prevent crawlers from indexing your site properly. As a result, your website rank may be downgraded. Please note that crawler may detect a working link as broken if your website blocks our crawler from accessing it. This may happen due to the following reasons:
Pages not crawled This issue indicates that crawler couldn’t access the webpage because the server either timed out or refused/closed the connection before our crawler could receive a response.
DNS resolution issue A DNS resolution error is reported when crawler can’t resolve the hostname when trying to access your webpage
We couldn’t open the page?s URL It looks like your robots.txt file is blocking us, or you have input an inccorect URL
Broken external links Broken external links lead users from one website to another and bring them to non-existent webpages. Multiple broken links negatively affect user experience and may worsen your search engine rankings because crawlers may think that your website is poorly maintained or coded.
Broken internal images An internal broken image is an image that can’t be displayed because it no longer exists, its URL is misspelled, or because the file path is not valid. Broken images may jeopardize your search rankings because they provide a poor user experience and signal to search engines that your page is low quality.
Broken external images A broken external image is an image that can’t be displayed because it no longer exists or because its URL is misspelled. Having too many broken external images negatively affects user experience and may be a signal to search engines that your website is poorly coded or maintained.
Duplicate meta descriptions Though meta descriptions don’t have a direct influence on rankings, they are used by search engines to display your page’s description in search results. A good description helps users know what your page is about and encourages them to click on it. If your page’s meta description tag is missing, search engines will usually display its first sentence, which may be irrelevant and unappealing to users.
Invalid robots.txt format If your robots.txt file is poorly configured, it can lead to disastrous results. One mistake can damage your search rankings, ruining all your search engine optimization efforts.
Invalid sitemap.xml format If your sitemap.xml file has any errors, search engines will not be able to process the data it contains, and they will ignore it.
Incorrect pages found in sitemap.xml A sitemap.xml file makes it easier for crawlers to discover the pages on your website. Only good pages intended for your visitors should be included in your sitemap.xml file.
www resolve issues Normally, a webpage can be accessed with or without adding www to its domain name. If you haven’t specified which version should be prioritized, search engines will crawl both versions, and the link juice will be split between them. Therefore, none of your page versions will get high positions in search results.
Viewport not configured The viewport meta tag is an HTML tag that allows you to control a page’s viewport size and scale on mobile devices. This tag is indispensable if you want to make your website accessible and optimized for mobile devices.
Large HTML page size A webpage’s HTML size is the size of all HTML code contained on it. A page size that is too large (i.e., exceeding 2 MB) leads to a slower page load time, resulting in a poor user experience and a lower search engine ranking.
Missing canonical tags in AMP pages A canonical tag (aka “rel canonical”) is a way of telling search engines that a specific URL represents the master copy of a page. Using the canonical tagprevents problems caused by identical or “duplicate” content appearing on multiple URLs.
Issues with hreflang values This issue is reported if your page has neither lang nor hreflang attribute.
Hreflang conflicts within page source code This issue is reported if your page has neither lang nor hreflang attribute.
Issues with incorrect hreflang links This issue is reported if your page has neither lang nor hreflang attribute.
Non-secure pages This issue is triggered if crawler detects an HTTP page with a <input type=”password”> field. Using a <input type=”password”> field on your HTTP page is harmful to user security, as there is a high risk that user login credentials can be stolen. To protect users’ sensitive information from being compromised, Google Chrome will start informing users about the dangers of submitting their passwords on HTTP pages by labeling such pages as “non-secure” starting January 2017. This could have a negative impact on your bounce rate, as users will most likely feel uncomfortable and leave your page as quickly as possible.
Certificate Expiration If you allow your certificate to expire, users accessing your website will be presented with a warning message, which usually stops them from going further and may lead to a drop in your organic search traffic.
Old security protocol version Running SSL or old TLS protocol (version 1.0) is a security risk, which is why it is strongly recommended that you implement the newest protocol versions.
Certificate registered to incorrect name If the domain name to which your SSL certificate is registered doesn’t match the name displayed in the address bar, web browsers will block users from visiting your website by showing them a name mismatch error, and this will in turn negatively affect your organic search traffic.
Issues with mixed content If your website contains any elements that are not secured with HTTPS, this may lead to security issues. Moreover, browsers will warn users about loading unsecure content, and this may negatively affect user experience and reduce their confidence in your website.
Links lead to HTTP pages for HTTPS site If you’re running both HTTP and HTTPS versions of your homepage, it is very important to make sure that their coexistence doesn’t impede your SEO. Search engines are not able to figure out which page to index and which one to prioritize in search results. As a result, you may experience a lot of problems, including pages competing with each other, traffic loss and poor placement in search results. To avoid these issues, you must instruct search engines to only index the HTTPS version.
Neither canonical URL nor 301 redirect from HTTP homepage If you’re running both HTTP and HTTPS versions of your homepage, it is very important to make sure that their coexistence doesn’t impede your SEO. Search engines are not able to figure out which page to index and which one to prioritize in search results. As a result, you may experience a lot of problems, including pages competing with each other, traffic loss and poor placement in search results. To avoid these issues, you must instruct search engines to only index the HTTPS version.
Redirect chains and loops Redirecting one URL to another is appropriate in many situations. However, if redirects are done incorrectly, it can lead to disastrous results
AMP Pages with HTML Issues In order for AMP pages to be served properly to mobile users, they must be compliant with AMP guidelines. If your HTML doesn’t adhere to AMP standards, your AMP page will not work correctly and may not be indexed by search engines, and, as a result, may not appear in mobile search results.
AMP Pages with Style and Layout Issues In order for AMP pages to be served properly to mobile users, they must be compliant with AMP guidelines.
AMP Pages with Templating Issues In order for AMP pages to be served properly to mobile users, they must be compliant with AMP guidelines. If your AMP page includes templating syntax, it will not work correctly and may not be indexed by search engines, and, as a result, may not appear in mobile search results.
Broken canonical URLs By setting a rel=”canonical” element on your page, you can inform search engines of which version of a page you want to show up in search results. When using canonical tags, it is important to make sure that the URL you include in your rel=”canonical” element leads to a page that actually exists. Canonical links that lead to non-existent webpages complicate the process of crawling and indexing your content and, as a result, decrease crawling efficiency and lead to unnecessary crawl budget waste.
Multiple canonical URLs Multiple rel=”canonical” tags with different URLs specified for the same page confuse search engines and make it almost impossible for them to identify which URL is the actual canonical page. As a result, search engines will likely ignore all the canonical elements or pick the wrong one. That’s why it is recommended that you specify no more than one rel=”canonical” for a page.
Meta refresh redirects A meta refresh tag instructs a web browser to redirect a user to a different page after a given interval. Generally, it is recommended that you avoid using a meta refresh tag as it is considered a poor, slow and outdated technique that may lead to SEO and usability issues.
Title element is too short Meta descriptions can be any length, but search engines generally truncate snippets longer than 160 characters. It’s best to keep meta descriptions long enough that they’re sufficiently descriptive, but shorter than the 160-character limit.
Title element is too long Meta descriptions can be any length, but search engines generally truncate snippets longer than 160 characters. It’s best to keep meta descriptions long enough that they’re sufficiently descriptive, but shorter than the 160-character limit.
Missing h1 While less important than <title> tags, h1 headings still help define your page’s topic for search engines and users. If an <h1> tag is empty or missing, search engines may place your page lower than they would otherwise. Besides, a lack of an <h1> tag breaks your page’s heading hierarchy, which is not SEO friendly.
Multiple h1 tags It is a bad idea to duplicate your title tag content in your first-level header. If your page’s <title> and <h1> tags match, the latter may appear over-optimized to search engines. Also, using the same content in titles and headers means a lost opportunity to incorporate other relevant keywords for your page.
Duplicate content in h1 and title It is a bad idea to duplicate your title tag content in your first-level header. If your page’s <title> and <h1> tags match, the latter may appear over-optimized to search engines. Also, using the same content in titles and headers means a lost opportunity to incorporate other relevant keywords for your page.
Missing meta description Though meta descriptions don’t have a direct influence on rankings, they are used by search engines to display your page’s description in search results. A good description helps users know what your page is about and encourages them to click on it. If your page’s meta description tag is missing, search engines will usually display its first sentence, which may be irrelevant and unappealing to users.
Too many on-page links This issue is triggered if a webpage contains more than three thousand links. Crawler doesn’t crawl more than three thousand on-page links. As a rule, other search engines crawlers treat webpages with too many links the same way: they crawl the first 3000 links on a page and ignore all the links that are over three thousand limit. Placing tons of links on a webpage can make your page look low quality and even spammy to search engines, which may cause your page to drop in rankings or not to show up in search results at all. Having too many on-page links is also bad for user experience.
Temporary redirects Temporary redirects (i.e., a 302 and a 307 redirect) mean that a page has been temporarily moved to a new location. Search engines will continue to index the redirected page, and no link juice or traffic is passed to the new page, which is why temporary redirects can damage your search rankings if used by mistake.
Missing ALT attributes Alt attributes within <img> tags are used by search engines to understand the contents of your images. If you neglect alt attributes, you may miss the chance to get a better placement in search results because alt attributes allow you to rank in image search results. Not using alt attributes also negatively affects the experience of visually impaired users and those who have disabled images in their browsers.
Slow page load speed Page load speed is one of the most important ranking factors. The quicker your page loads, the higher the rankings it can receive. Moreover, fast-loading pages positively affect user experience and may increase your conversion rates.
Low text to HTML ratio Your text to HTML ratio indicates the amount of actual text you have on your webpage compared to the amount of code.
Too many URL parameters Using too many URL parameters is not an SEO-friendly approach. Multiple parameters make URLs less enticing for users to click and may cause search engines to fail to index some of your most important pages.
Missing hreflang and lang attributes This issue is reported if your page has neither lang nor hreflang attribute. When running a multilingual website, you should make sure that you’re doing it correctly. First, you should use a hreflang attribute to indicate to Google which pages should be shown to visitors based on their location. That way, you can rest assured that your users will always land on the correct language version of your website. You should also declare a language for your webpage’s content (i.e., lang attribute). Otherwise, your web text might not be recognized by search engines. It also may not appear in search results, or may be displayed incorrectly.
Encoding not declared Providing a character encoding tells web browsers which set of characters must be used to display a webpage’s content. If a character encoding is not specified, browsers may not render the page content properly, which may result in a negative user experience. Moreover, search engines may consider pages without a character encoding to be of little help to users and, therefore, place them lower in search results than those with a specified encoding.
Doctype not declared A webpage’s doctype instructs web browsers which version of HTML or XHTML is being used. Declaring a doctype is extremely important in order for a page’s content to load properly. If no doctype is specified, this may lead to various problems, such as messed up page content or slow page load speed, and, as a result, negatively affect user experience.
Low word count The average top ranking page has more than 1200 words
Flash content used Although, Flash-based pages may look nice, it is not recommended that you use Flash content for several reasons. Most importantly, Flash content negatively impacts your website’s visibility because it cannot be properly indexed and crawled by search engines. Secondly, using Flash content negatively affects your website’s performance. Search engines may consider it as a signal that your website isn’t worth ranking. And finally, Flash content doesn’t work well on mobile devices.
Frames used <frame> tags are considered to be one of the most significant search engine optimization issues. Not only is it difficult for search engines to index and crawl content within <frame> tags, which may in turn lead to your page being excluded from search results, using these tags also negatively affects user experience.
Underscores in URL When it comes to URL structure, using underscores as word separators is not recommended because search engines may not interpret them correctly and may consider them to be a part of a word. Using hyphens instead of underscores makes it easier for search engines to understand what your page is about. Although using underscores doesn’t have a huge impact on webpage visibility, it decreases your page’s chances of appearing in search results, as opposed to when hyphens are used.
Nofollow attributes in internal links The rel=”nofollow” attribute is an element in an <a> tag that tells crawlers not to follow the link (e.g., “<a href=”http://example.com/link” rel=”nofollow”>Nofollow link example</a>”).”Nofollow” links don’t pass any link juice to referred webpages. That’s why it is not recommended that you use nofollow attributes in internal links. You should let link juice flow freely throughout your website. Moreover, unintentional use of nofollow attributes may result in your webpage being ignored by search engine crawlers even if it contains a valuable content.
Sitemap.xml not specified in robots.txt If you have both a sitemap.xml and a robots.txt file on your website, it is a good practice to place a link to your sitemap.xml in your robots.txt, which will allow search engines to better understand what content they should crawl.
Sitemap.xml not found A sitemap.xml file is used to list all URLs available for crawling. It can also include additional data about each URL.
HTTP encryption not used Google considers a website’s security as a ranking factor. Websites that do not support HTTPS connections may be less prominent in Google’s search results, while HTTPS-protected sites will rank higher with its search algorithms.
No SNI support One of the common issues you may face when using HTTPS is when your web server doesn’t support Server Name Indication (SNI). Using SNI allows you to support multiple servers and host multiple certificates at the same IP address, which may improve security and trust.
HTTP URLs in sitemap.xml for HTTPS site Your sitemap.xml should include the links that you want search engines to find and index. Using different URL versions in your sitemap could be misleading to search engines and may result in an incomplete crawling of your website.
Uncompressed pages This issue is triggered if the Content-Encoding entity is not present in the response header. Page compression is essential to the process of optimizing your website. Using uncompressed pages leads to a slower page load time, resulting in a poor user experience and a lower search engine ranking.
Disallowed resources Blocked resources are resources (e.g., CSS, JavaScript, image files, etc.) that are blocked from crawling by a “Disallow” directive in your robots.txt file. By disallowing these files, you’re preventing search engines from accessing them and, as a result, properly rendering and indexing your webpages
Blocked from crawling If a page cannot be accessed by search engines, it will never appear in search results. A page can be blocked from crawling either by a robots.txt file or a noindex meta tag.
Too long URLs According to Google, URLs longer than 100 characters are not SEO friendly. Excessive URL length intimidates users and discourages them from clicking or sharing it, thus hurting your page’s click-through rate and usability. Besides, some browsers may have difficulties parsing extremely long URLs.
Nofollow attributes in external links A nofollow attribute is an element in an <a> tag that tells crawlers not to follow the link. “Nofollow” links don’t pass any link juice or anchor texts to referred webpages. The unintentional use of nofollow attributes may have a negative impact on the crawling process and your rankings.
Robots.txt not found A robots.txt file has an important impact on your overall SEO website’s performance. This file helps search engines determine what content on your website they should crawl. Utilizing a robots.txt file can cut the time search engine robots spend crawling and indexing your website.
Hreflang language mismatch issues This issue is triggered if a language value specified in a hreflang attribute doesn’t match your page’s language, which is determined based on semantic analysis. Any mistakes in hreflang attributes may confuse search engines, and your hreflang attributes will most likely be interpreted incorrectly. So it’s worth taking the time to make sure you don’t have any issues with hreflang attributes.
No HSTS support HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) informs web browsers that they can communicate with servers only through HTTPS connections. So, to ensure that you don’t serve unsecured content to your audience, we recommend that you implement HSTS support.
Orphaned pages (Google Analytics) A webpage that is not linked to internally is called an orphaned page. It is very important to check your website for such pages. If a page has valuable content but is not linked to by another page on your website, it can miss out on the opportunity to receive enough link juice. Orphaned pages that no longer serve their purpose confuse your users and, as a result, negatively affect their experience. We identify orphaned pages on your website by comparing the number of pages we crawled to the number of pages in your Google Analytics account. That’s why to check your website for any orphaned pages, you need to connect your Google Analytics account.
Orphaned sitemap pages An orphaned page is a webpage that is not linked to internally. Including orphaned pages in your sitemap.xml files is considered to be a bad practice, as these pages will be crawled by search engines. Crawling outdated orphaned pages will waste your crawl budget. If an orphaned page in your sitemap.xml file has valuable content, we recommend that you link to it internally.
Pages have high Document Interactive Time We all know that slow page-load speed negatively affects user experience. However, if a user can start interacting with your webpage within 1 second, they are much less likely to click away from this page. That’s why it is important to keep a close eye on the time it takes your most important webpages to become usable, known as the Average Document Interactive Time.
Blocked by X-Robots-Tag: noindex HTTP header The x-robots-tag is an HTTP header that can be used to instruct search engines whether or not they can index or crawl a webpage. This tag supports the same directives as a regular meta robots tag and is typically used to control the crawling of non-HTML files. If a page is blocked from crawling with x-robots-tag, it will never appear in search results.